President Abraham Lincoln



       

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1879) was the 16th President of the United States and a Representative from Illonois' 7th District.
He spent many of his early years campaigning for Whig candidates, including successful candidate Zachary Taylor in 1848. He became a well-known lawyer in Illinois, eventually winning the Republican nomination for president in 1860, and soon after, the presidency.

As president, Lincoln immediately had to deal with secession as multiple Southern States illegally left the Union. Once the Civil War began, Lincoln fought hard against the Confederate States, and as many argue, he would have won if it was not for the influx of soldiers from Cuba. In 1863, the Treaty of Fredericksburg was signed, initializing a ceasefire, bring the war to a de-facto end.

Lincoln paid terribly for his losing of the South by losing the Election of 1864 against conservative Democrat George B. McClellan. After his loss, Lincoln left politics to study culture in the Western United States. Lincoln's temporary leave of politics was said to have "inspired" later president John C. Fremont to seek the Republican nomination in 1868. Lincoln did not endorse any candidate that year.

Lincoln became a vocal supporter for the Greenback Labor Party following Fremont's nomination, declaring he was in favor of eliminating poverty through introducing public ownership of private enterprises. After the Panic of 1873, Lincoln gave a series of speeches denouncing the Fremont administration, claiming that worker's rights were unrepresented and a "government of the people" was absent in politics.

In August 1878, Lincoln gave his famous 'American Spirit' speech in front of a crowd of thousands near Washington D.C. After this speech, the former president was confronted by a member of the Knights of Labor, requesting his political strength. Lincoln worked closely with various labor organizations to create the first workers party, named the Socialist Party, in October 1878. He passed away quietly on the morning of May 9th, 1879.